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ACH Group and NARI partner for aged care research

ACH Group and NARI partner for aged care research

ACH Group has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the National Ageing Research Institute (NARI) bringing the organisations together to improve the health and wellbeing of older people.

The new agreement aims to strengthen the capacity of both organisations to jointly pursue research goals, provide expert leadership, and promote excellence in the field of ageing and aged care.

“ACH Group has recently developed a research and development strategy and our new alliance with NARI will enhance our strong commitment to being evidence-based and data informed,” ACH Group CEO Frank Weits said.

“ACH Group is passionate about re-imaging aged care, including developing new models, technology and innovations to meet the changing needs of our customers.

“This collaboration will support ACH Group to make practical changes that will have a lasting positive impact on residents, home care customers, and carers.”

NARI Acting Director, Associate Professor Frances Batchelor, said the partnership will be invaluable to both organisations, fostering research and service delivery of the highest quality.

“By working closely with an aged care organisation like ACH Group, NARI will be able to embed our research into everyday practice. In this way, evidence-based interventions can be rolled out directly into care homes and services, and we can make positive change,” Associate Professor Batchelor said.

“Building relationships with industry bodies allows for vital progress to be made, with the input and consideration of those at the heart of our work – older people and their carers. This new agreement will help us continue with our strategic approach to knowledge transfer, education, training, and upskilling of health professionals.”

With both NARI and ACH Group focused on a consumer-led approach, the partnership will provide opportunities for new research, funding, and workforce capacity building, benefiting both parties and — most importantly — the older people they support.

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