ACH Group artists exhibiting in 2021 SALA Festival

SALA 2021 exhibition

ACH Group’s art community is ready for the 2021 South Australian Living Artists (SALA) Festival.

In its 11th year of participation, ACH Group’s community of customers, residents, volunteers, and staff will submit over 100 works under the theme of ‘From little things big things grow’ to be exhibited across three venues state-wide.

The majority of works have been created in ACH Group’s community arts groups, run across metropolitan Adelaide and the Fleurieu Peninsula, as well as art classes in residential care homes.

Stephen who is living with Parkinson joins SALA 2021

Community class artist Stephen Hill will be submitting an acrylic on canvas painting of a Monarch butterfly sitting on a sunflower.

The SALA Festival marks one year since Stephen joined the ACH Group art class held in Aberfoyle Park.

Stephen is living with Parkinson’s Disease, and the prospects of a new hobby he would enjoy, combined with being aware that art can be a useful therapy for Parkinson’s made the decision to join the group an easy one.

“With Parkinson’s there is nothing you can do about its existence and progression. It is all about managing and finding activities that might make it easier to live with it,” he said.

“The activity forces my brain and nervous system to concentrate hard, so I can hold the paint brush steady.

“Even though I had never done painting in my adult life, I have always had a certain interest in it and in high school I was fairly good at it. I am enjoying the classes and look forward to exhibiting in SALA.”

To celebrate SALA, ACH Group is offering free come and try art classes available to people aged 65 and over.

To find a class near you and for exhibition opening times visit www.achgroup.org.au/event/sala/

Media inquiries: Lauren Bobrige, ACH Group Communication Advisor, 0417 856 361, lbobrige@ach.org.au

2021 ACH Group knitting drive

ACH Group knitting project partnered with Vinnes

Calling all knitters and knitters to be!

ACH Group residents are driven to give back and need the community’s help to keep hearts full and hands warm this winter.
Residents at ACH Group’s eight residential care homes are seeking to partner with knitting enthusiasts from across the state to make mittens, gloves and scarves for people supported by charity organisation St Vincent de Paul Society (Vinnies).

Anyone handy with a needle and thread is being asked to knit the base pieces for mittens using a supplied pattern and drop off to ACH Group Perry Park residential care home at Port Noarlunga, or ACH Group’s office in Mile End. From there, residents will sew the pieces together and decorate the mittens ready to be gifted to Vinnies. Residents will also knit gloves and scarves; two items Vinnies have identified are also in demand this winter.

Knitting project ACH Group Knitting project at ACH group

Download the pattern here.

It’s all part of aged care provider ACH Group’s ‘Keeping hearts full and hands warm’ campaign.

ACH Group CEO Frank Weits said the initiative – now in its second year – is driven by residents wanting to give back to the community and support those experiencing homelessness.

“2020 was the first year of the campaign with over 100 knitted pieces donated to Vinnies by Perry Park residents and their local community,” Mr Weits said.

“On the back of this success, residents from all eight ACH Group residential care homes are getting involved this year and are looking forward about teaming up with fellow sewing and knitting enthusiasts.

“It’s a lovely way for residents to work in partnership with the broader community, build meaningful connections, and help South Australians experiencing homelessness.”

Vinnies Fred’s Van Coordinator Teresa Branch said, “Vinnies was delighted to receive the knitted items last year, and they were gratefully received by the men and women staying in our crisis centres and people accessing the Fred’s Van meal service.
“To know that someone had gone out of their way to knit something made them all the more meaningful during a time when people were in a very vulnerable state.
“We can’t wait to see this initiative come to life again.”

The completed knitted pieces can be dropped off or posted before August 31 to:

ACH Group Perry Park
26 River Road
Port Noarlunga SA 5167

ACH Group Office
22 Henley Beach Road
Mile End SA 5031

Not a knitter but have some balls of wool taking up room in your cupboard, we would love your donations!

There are 2 drop off locations:

ACH Group Perry Park
26 River Road
Port Noarlunga SA 5167

ACH Group Office
22 Henley Beach Road
Mile End SA 5031

For inquires on the knitting drive contact Perry Park, Lifestyle Coordinator, Angie Clark on (08) 8329 7777.
*Please note, all current Government residential home requirements will be upheld on arrival to Perry Park. Please refer to our Site Entry Requirements here.
For media inquiries contact ACH Group Communication Advisor, Lauren Bobrige via lbobrige@ach.org.au or 0417 856 361.

Join an ACH Group supported Fringe night out

ACH Group is offering three different fully supported entertainment packages so you can experience the Adelaide Fringe with ease.

Experience the mesmerising power of gospel singing with the Soweto Gospel Choir night out. Take your time to discover the Garden of Unearthly Delights and Yabbarra Dreaming in Light show night out, or travel back to the 1920’s to the golden years of magic with Auslusion in Improbable Deductions.

Or would you prefer to book your own Fringe show and want cheaper tickets? Get $10 off your Fringe membership just by being part of the ACH Group community.

Being a Fringe Member gets you exclusive access to discounted gigs, shows and venues all year. To claim this offer, call FringeTix on 8100 2088 or visit the Fringe website and apply the discount code ACHGROUP20

See you at the Fringe!

New dog park to create connections

Dog park at ACH Group Perry Park

A new dog park at Port Noarlunga is set to get tails wagging and create community connections at ACH Group’s Perry Park.

Located alongside the Perry Park residential care home and adjoining retirement living units on Murray Road and Riverview Drive, the park has been created in an enclosed communal space with a barbecue and seating, shading and dog water fountain.

ACH Group’s CEO, Frank Weits, said it was hoped the park would bring together owners of dogs and others in the community.

“For many people, young and old, our dogs can be a connection point, a way of bringing people together, starting a conversation and helping people form new relationships,” he said. “Pets are our companions, they can reduce loneliness and depression, relieve stress, lower blood pressure, provide opportunities for social interaction and exercise, a sense of purpose and belonging.”

Residents also experience other benefits living in retirement villages as they can make use of a range of shared spaces, like Perry Park’s new dog park.   Common spaces and activities, whether they be a BBQ area, a community hall or a simple park bench make catching up with neighbors easy; helping to connect and bring people together and reducing social isolation and loneliness.

“ACH Group is committed to providing good lives for older people, which includes connecting and supporting our communities to be as healthy and happy as possible.”

City of Onkaparinga Mayor Erin Thompson and ACH Group CEO Frank Weits officially opened the park at Perry Park Retirement Living Village Murray Road this week.

Residents from the village together with their dogs Bertie, Benji, Scruffy, Roxy, Holly, Olly and friends joined in the opening, enjoying ‘puppuccinos’, dog treats and free vet checks.

ACH Group allows people to bring a small pet with them when they move into most Retirement Living locations across South Australia and Victoria.

ACH Group innovation recognised in national aged care award

hesta innovation winner

ACH Group’s work to attract more nurses to the aged care sector has been recognised in the 2019 HESTA Aged Care Awards announced yesterday.

ACH Group’s Student Placement Team has taken out the Team Innovation category in the awards, which recognise Australia’s most innovative and proactive aged care organisations, teams and individuals.

ACH Group was one of four finalists in its category and 12 finalists in the national awards.

Samantha Manoel, Student Placement Manager at ACH Group, said the award provided recognition of the organisation’s aim to attract more nursing students to work in aged care by developing a strategy to improve the experience students have during their university placements with ACH Group.

“We identified that negative stereotypes were a significant factor in the shortage of nurses working in the sector,” Ms Manoel said. “We set out to develop a strategy to demonstrate first-hand to students that working in aged care can be a rewarding job and career.”

The team has developed a number of student placement initiatives to change student perceptions, including a pre-placement education day, providing an informative online orientation, developing an induction booklet and conducting pre- and post-placement student evaluations. Since these changes in 2012, more than 4,000 students have had placements in ACH Group services.

“Post-placement feedback shows that students now consider aged care as a unique and dynamic work environment, with 68 per cent of students saying they were interested in working in aged care compared to only 40 per cent who said they were interested prior to their placement.”

Ms Manoel said pre-placement education day touched on a range of areas including healthy ageing, dementia, the admissions process and relationship building. “We find that this day helps alleviate any stress or uncertainty about working in an aged care environment,” she said. “Students are given an insight into all aspects of care from all disciplines, including allied health offerings and early intervention initiatives. We want people to understand that the aged care workplace is a place that’s dynamic, and that it’s about supporting people to live a good life.”

HESTA CEO Debby Blakey said this year’s finalists were selected for their outstanding compassion, leadership and innovation in improving services and standards of care in the aged care sector.

“This year’s finalists have pushed the boundaries and developed innovative services and programs that rise to the challenge of providing high-quality care to the growing number of ageing Australians,” Ms Blakey said.

Update on the Royal Commission

Royal Commission update

The Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety released an interim report on 31 October 2019, providing insight into what the Commission has learnt from 13 hearings held across the country and over 6800 submissions since January 2019.

The Commissioners identified three areas where immediate action can be taken to:

  • provide more Home Care Packages to reduce the waiting list for higher level care at home
  • respond to the significant over-reliance on chemical restraint in aged care
  • stop the flow of younger people with a disability going into aged care.

The report also identifies systemic problems in aged care with a system that;

  • is designed around transactions, not relationships or care,
  • minimises the voices of people receiving care and their loved ones,
  • is hard to navigate and does not provide information people need to make informed choices about their care,
  • relies on a regulatory model that does not provide transparency or an incentive to improve, and;
  • has a workforce that is under pressure and under-appreciated and that lacks key skills.

Despite the identified failures, the Commissioners also heard many examples of providers who deliver innovative and effective models of care and examples of individual staff members dedicating themselves to providing exemplary and compassionate care, despite the challenges of the system and their environment.

The interim report can be read here: https://agedcare.royalcommission.gov.au/publications/Pages/interim-report.aspx. The final report is due by 12 November 2020.

ACH Group strongly supports the work of the Royal Commission because it:

  • is committed to continual improvement and transparency
  • values its passionate and dedicated workforce and recognises the great service they provide with empathy and professionalism
  • wants the aged care sector to be strengthened through industry-wide improvements so all older Australians have access to affordable, quality care and services that meet their changing needs as they age.

As part of ACH Group’s commitment to excellence, feedback on our services and the care provided to residents and customers is always welcomed via www.achgroup.org.au/contact/feedback or by calling 1300 22 44 77.

Dementia a focus of exchange

ach group volunteers posing for photo

A group of aged care workers from Sun-Vision Social Welfare Corporation in Japan will spend a week in South Australia learning about the latest in dementia care, prevention and understanding as part of an exchange with not-for-profit aged care provider ACH Group.

The group of 11, including social workers, care workers, team leaders and unit leaders, will focus on innovation and the latest thinking on brain health ahead of Sun-Vision Social Welfare Corporation’s international symposium on dementia care next year.

Sun-Vision Coordinator Tomoko Suzuki said the group was interested in ACH Group’s Planning Ahead Advisory Service which supported people to complete an Advance Care Directive and Enduring Power of Attorney. “We would like to learn how ACH Group supports people living with dementia who have difficulties communicating their decisions, will and preferences,” she says.

Welcoming the group, ACH Group CEO said: “For over a decade we’ve exchanged ‘students’ to learn about aged care from different cultures and perspectives and share best practice developments. A key learning has been our shared passion for working with older people to support them to have their best life.”

The group will hear about ACH Group’s strategies to reduce employee turnover, innovation in mobility and independent living equipment and focus on early intervention to improve health outcomes. They will also learn about ACH Group’s holistic approach to physical, mental and cognitive health at each of its residential care homes to help residents continue to live healthier, happier and more active lives.

During the week the group will participate in a range of activities that are of benefit to people living with dementia including a mosaics and tai chi class at Colton Court, McLaren Vale and will participate in a dementia master class with dementia expert Teresa Moran at ViTA, Daw Park. The exchange will wrap up with a visit to South Australian attractions Gorge Wildlife Park and Beerenberg Farm at Hahndorf.

In its 12th year, the Sun-Life exchange program involves annual visits to Australia and bi-annual visits by ACH Group employees to Japan.

A delegation from ACH Group who travelled to Japan in October as part of the exchange will help as hosts and translators on this visit.

ACH Group a finalist in 2019 HESTA Aged Care Awards

Uni SA nurses training on patient

ACH Group’s work to attract more nurses to the aged care sector has been recognised in the 2019 HESTA Aged Care Awards.

ACH Group’s Student Placement Team is one of four national finalists in the Team Innovation category. A total of 12 finalists have been announced in the awards, which recognise Australia’s most innovative and proactive aged care organisations, teams and individuals.

Samantha Manoel, Student Placement Manager at ACH Group, said the award provided recognition of the organisation’s aim to attract more nursing students to work in aged care by developing a strategy to improve the experience students have during their university placements with ACH Group.

“We identified that negative stereotypes were a significant factor in the shortage of nurses working in the sector,” Ms Manoel said. “We set out to develop a strategy to demonstrate first-hand to students that working in aged care can be a rewarding job and career.”

The team has developed a number of student placement initiatives to change student perceptions, including a pre-placement education day, providing an informative online orientation, developing an induction booklet and conducting pre- and post-placement student evaluations. Since these changes in 2012, more than 4,000 students have had placements in ACH Group services.

“Post-placement feedback shows that students now consider aged care as a unique and dynamic work environment, with 68 per cent of students saying they were interested in working in aged care compared to only 40 per cent who said they were interested prior to their placement.”

Ms Manoel said pre-placement education day touched on a range of areas including healthy ageing, dementia, the admissions process and relationship building. “We find that this day helps alleviate any stress or uncertainty about working in an aged care environment,” she said. “Students are given an insight into all aspects of care from all disciplines, including allied health offerings and early intervention initiatives. We want people to understand that the aged care workplace is a place that’s dynamic, and that it’s about supporting people to live a good life.”

HESTA CEO Debby Blakey said this year’s finalists were selected for their outstanding compassion, leadership and innovation in improving services and standards of care in the aged care sector.

“This year’s finalists have pushed the boundaries and developed innovative services and programs that rise to the challenge of providing high-quality care to the growing number of ageing Australians,” Ms Blakey said.

Winners will be announced at the 2019 HESTA Aged Care Awards on 14 November 2019 in Adelaide.

Please click here for more information about ACH Group’s Student Placement program.

Read more about the award from HESTA here.

Nature Play

Finding ways around too much ‘screen time’ is a constant challenge for today’s parents, grandparents and carers. We’ve tracked down some great outdoor play spaces to help get you and the kids out and about this spring.

 

St Kilda Mangrove Trail

Explore a real mangrove at St Kilda where a 1.5km boardwalk provides an easy walk through tidal salt marshes, samphires and sea grass channels to a lookout. The walk is a short drive from the popular St Kilda Adventure Playground, which underwent a $3.5 million revamp in 2015.

Mangrove Street, St Kilda

walkingsa.org.au/walk/find-a-place-to-walk/st-kilda-mangrove-trail/

 

Woodhouse Activity Centre

Head to the hills for a day in the bush at Woodhouse, owned and operated by Scouts SA. Kids can climb, swing and crawl their way around 30 obstacles at Challenge Hill, try a giant split level maze, whizz down two new tube slides, try the nine-hole disc golf field or try an orienteering course. Woodhouse is open seven days a week and runs drop-and-go school holiday activities.

37 Spring Gully Road, Piccadilly

woodhouse.org.au

 

Morialta Play Space

Designers spent months creating a nature-based play space at the Morialta Recreation Area. Five themes are featured: Kookaburra nests, climbing boulders, frog island, eagle’s nest and great snake. Created from natural materials such as stone and timber, including recycled timbers, the design incorporates Aboriginal culture, native plants and animals and offers serious physical challenges for all ages.

Stradbroke Road, Morialta

parks.sa.gov.au/Safety/park-alerts/172209-morilata-conservation-park

 

Oaklands Estate Reserve

Opened in May this year, the Oaklands Estate Reserve has a wetland, skate park, education centre and rotunda. Upgrades include two km of paths, a new playground and nature play area with logs, ropes and a timber climbing frame, three new shelters and two barbecues and a Japanese garden with sand and water play areas.

Oaklands Estate Reserve, Oaklands Road, Oaklands Park

marion.sa.gov.au/things-to-do/parks-and-playgrounds/oaklands-estate-reserve

 

Jervois Street Reserve, South Plympton

Opened in 2016, this reserve has a nature play focus with logs, stacking stones and sand play. It’s also popular with older kids with a cycling ‘pump track’, basketball, a games area with table tennis and chess, a mini bike circuit and fitness equipment. This park has a barbecue, grassy areas, tunnels, swings and beams. The reserve is dotted with public art.

Jervois Street, South Plympton

marion.sa.gov.au/things-to-do/parks-and-playgrounds/jervois-street-reserve

 

Carrick Hill

Set in majestic grounds of the home that once belonged to Sir Edward and Lady Ursula Hayward, Carrick Hill is the perfect place for a picnic on a spring or summer day. Kids can roam the gardens, play ‘horses’ in the stables, and explore the Story Book Trail – a magical collection of stories brought to life. School holiday programs are available in October and April and self-guided quiz for its Story Book Trail is on offer during the December/January holidays.

46 Carrick Hill Drive, Springfield

carrickhill.sa.gov.au

 

Nature Play to-do list

Visit the Nature Play SA website where you can download lists of nature play ideas along with beautifully illustrated lists of South Australian plant and animal species found in the Myponga Reservoir Reserve and the coastline between Glenelg and Seacliff Beach.

natureplaysa.org.au/families/nature-play-downloads/

Cheong Liew’s ingredients of a good life

Synonymous with fine dining in Adelaide for years, legendary chef Cheong Liew reflects on his rise to fame, from Neddy’s to The Grange, and shares his thoughts on Instagram, gardening and being ‘Gung Gung’.

You were a big part of the food movement in the 70s and 80s. How do you reflect on that?
When I first came to South Australia, the popular restaurant was the pizza shop – that was the big night out. I worked in a Spanish restaurant in Hindley Street, and everything came out of a tin.

One of the first things I did back in the 70s was open Neddy’s restaurant. It was probably one of the first places where we would go to the market, buy all the ingredients, bring them back to the restaurant and start on the menu. That is how we started – everything was always on the blackboard.

People started saying that Neddy’s was cooking interesting food. Then we started getting all these hobby farmers bringing in produce for us like flat leaf parsley. That was very hard to get in the 70s. You could always get the curly but not the flat leaf Italian variety. Now it’s so common, it’s like a weed in my garden. The same with lettuce – so much variety now.

Neddy’s had a fabulous reputation without social media. Do you think Instagram has changed things?
We never thought about taking pictures of our food. Even in the 70s we hardly took any photos of our food at Neddy’s. Now, everything I cook, I always take a picture.

After Neddy’s, you then moved on to the Grange at The Hilton?
The Hilton era was great. The success of one place is everyone working together. It takes a team like the one at The Grange, it is next level. It was food for people that wanted to excite themselves, once in a lifetime. Something more extraordinary!

Can you tell us about your early years?
As a boy, I lived on a farm. We would walk for miles to catch a bus to get to school.

Why Adelaide?
I went to Melbourne and studied engineering for a couple of years before moving to Adelaide to visit my brother Khai. Adelaide was much better for me because in Melbourne I wasn’t mixing with other people. My brother had so many different friends – Malaysian, Italian, Czech and Polish.

What’s been happening in 2019?

I celebrated my 70th birthday earlier this year and went back to my home in Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. We had a family reunion; like a clan gathering. There were about 60 people including my cousins and their offspring – all my family from Australia, Canada and America too.